Not many are aware that a vehicle which intends to:

i) Change its engine of the same c.c.

ii) Transfer of ownership.

iii) Fix L.P.G. (Liquefied Petroleum Gas).

iv) Change of registration number.

and other personal transactions not mentioned above, the vehicle would first have to be sent to the Puspakom authorities to undergo 10 points check.

Puspakom has centres all around for the purpose of inspecting vehicles. Today, the J.P.J. no longer conducts vehicle inspection. Puspakom has inspection centres in Kamung Jawa, Sungai Mangis and other places around Selangor. They also has inspection centres throughout the nation.

I recently had to send a vehicle, which needed to checked by the Puspakom to do the transfer of a car engine. I had no choice but to do the above process myself. The reason being, the middle men had demanded a sum of at least RM450 for the service!

I have no intention of ever paying such an exorbitant amount. So the decision was made to send the car for the inspection personally.

Readers may wish to know how much the cost for the inspection. At the entry point, small vehicles have to pay an initial payment of RM35. On completion of car’s inspection, a further RM25 needed to be paid. Total required is RM60.

The inspection procedure itself took only 30 minutes or so. But the issuance of the inspection certificate took a rather long while. It was not until about 1:00pm before I received my inspection certificate.

Anyway, it was all worthwhile. Don’t forget, the fee demanded by the middle man came to approximately RM450.

What does the Puspakom’s 10 points check involve?

1) Identification of vehicle’s number.

Before any inspection, a vehicle’s number and model should first be verified. Cassis and engine numbers too needed to be verified too.

2) Emission test.

Diesel and not so much petrol vehicles have to be tested. Carbon dioxide level needed to be ascertained.

3) Brakes.

The parking brake condition has to be determined. Efficiency of all the 4 brakes has to be maintained. Imbalance is to be avoided. Optimal brake power has to be achieved wherever possible.

4) Suspension.

A car’s suspension is most important. Its spring, absorbers and joints are all needed to be inspected. Through the inspection of the vehicle, the lateral stability of a vehicle is maintained.

5) Above carriage check.

The upper body of a vehicle is to be checked too. This is in line with the Road Transport Ordinance 1970 Act and its requirements.

6) Side slip test.

The side slip test will ensure a vehicle’s good holding qualities.

7) The speedometer test.

In this test, the speedometer is tested as against the wheels of a car. This ensure the “speedo” records accurate speed of a vehicle.

8) Highlights test.

This test will determine if the high lights are performing correctly. The distance it should be focusing should also be checked.

9) Under carriage test.

The Axle Play Detector will be determine of the undercarriage is giving any problems or otherwise.

10) Tinted glass test.

This process will determine if the car could pass the Visible Light Transmission test.

Drivers are reminded that before your vehicle can pass the above 10 points inspection test conducted by the Puspakom, your vehicle must ideally be in fairly tip-top condition. Failing in any of the above will result in your vehicle not being awarded the certificate you need.

From my personal experience, getting through the above test wasn’t that easy after all.

In the Star newspaper report dated 29 October 2009, the Government has announced, under the National Automotive Policy (NAP), a policy for scraping of old vehicles and mandatory road worthiness inspections for vehicle aged 15 years or older before road tax renewal is to be enforced soon.